I’m a plus-size, celeb stylist – curvy women should be able to wear crop tops & skirts, anyone who disagrees is toxic

FASHION is meant to be the art form of personal expression and a catalyst for confidence – yet there’s still exclusivity within the industry, especially around trends.

Some people see specific styles as being better suited for smaller-size women, but one celebrity stylist has argued that the opposite is true, and anyone who thinks otherwise is toxic.

The rise and fall of trends can be attributed to individual icons in fashion and current social obsessions.

As these style concepts continue to cycle through the fashion sphere, space for creativity and experimentation can feel limiting for women who feel underrepresented in them.

However, celebrity stylist and body enthusiast Kat Eves refuses to believe that there is any trend off-limits to women of different shapes, sizes, and abilities.

“I don’t think there’s any reason why any trend can’t be size inclusive. If you feel comfortable and confident in it, it doesn’t really matter,” Kat tells The U.S. Sun.

Kat founded her brand The Style Ethic with the mission to create an ethical, sustainable, and inclusive space in the industry.

As a plus-size woman, she’s always loved fashion but didn’t always feel like it loved her back.

It wasn’t until her eyes were opened to the vast amount of second-hand plus-size options in San Diego, that her passion peaked.

Kat believes “fashion is an art form that every single person takes part in whether we realize it or not,” so why not embrace it instead of feeling controlled by it?

The 37-year-old’s professional styling career began with her first client Chris Reed, an actor in the television series Sons of Anarchy.

From famous comedian Dulcé Sloan to the talented Walking Dead star Pollyanna McIntosh, Kat’s client list includes transformative celebrities, as well as private individuals.

“I work with people of literally every body type. Every size, every shape, every ability, and that’s my focus,” Kat explained.

With a concentration on ethics and sustainability, every day, the inclusive designer encourages her clients to try what they wouldn’t have picked for themselves before – because they can.

“My biggest thing is making people feel comfortable and that their body is not a math problem to be solved.”

Removing the idea that you can’t wear something because of your shape or body’s ability is challenging.

But rather than thinking of crop tops, mini skirts, and see-through clothing as being strictly designed for one size, Kat directs her clients’ attention to their own feelings.

“The most important thing when dressing yourself is asking: ‘Do I feel confident and comfortable in this?’ and ‘Is this something that makes me feel like me?’” she said.

If you’re putting thought into your outfits, you’re unknowingly creating a representation of yourself.

And that’s what Kat helps her clients figure out, how they can construct a style that accurately depicts who they are and who they want to be.

“For my clients, I help them make their insides match their outsides,” she admitted.

If they decide they want to be someone who wears a bralette and low-rise jeans because they feel self-assured in it, then Kat lets them.

If someone prefers to cover up more and wear a baggy t-shirt and boxy jacket because that’s when they feel most like themselves, then that’s fine too.

Kat gives her clients the space to explore options without any judgment or restriction.

“I never want to invalidate someone else’s experience or feelings. I don’t approach it from a place of pushing back and I also don’t approach it from a place of criticism,” the stylist proclaimed.

“It’s not about flattering, it’s about what you feel comfortable and confident in, what you feel represents you the most.”

According to Kat, the individuals that believe certain trends only look flattering on specific size women, don’t have an accurate perception of what fashion is.

“People forget sometimes that fashion is an art,” she admitted.

The art of fashion is self-expression, and to make women feel confined to only certain styles is limiting that expression.

Oftentimes, celebrity clients come to her when they’ve had a less-than-positive experience with another stylist.

They’re usually looking for one that understands what it means to be body neutral when getting dressed.

She said: “The size two client who is fat phobic, isn’t going to knock on my door.”

And that’s okay because she sees those people as only contributing to the already-diminishing toxicity in the industry.

As more and more high-end designers and celebrity icons in fashion move toward being more inclusive, these “toxic” individuals become “less desirable.”

“When you scratch the surface, fashion police really are some of the most boring people on the planet,” Kat admitted.

“There is so much conversation even happening outside of the industry about burnout and toxic personalities, and toxic leaders in workplaces. Fashion is not immune to that.”

The plus-size community is thriving and growing with Kat as its leader.

About Israel Ashaolu 2090 Articles
Israel Ashaolu is a graduate of electrical and electronic from Niger state Polytechnic. Am an article writter and the owner of techedgeict.com

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